On Exactitude in Science

… In that Empire, the Art of Cartography attained such Perfection that the map of a single Province occupied the entirety of a City, and the map of the Empire, the entirety of a Province. In time, those Unconscionable Maps no longer satisfied, and the Cartographers Guilds struck a Map of the Empire whose size was that of the Empire, and which coincided point for point with it. The following Generations, who were not so fond of the Study of Cartography as their Forebears had been, saw that that vast Map was Useless, and not without some Pitilessness was it, that they delivered it up to the Inclemencies of Sun and Winters. In the Deserts of the West, still today, there are Tattered Ruins of that Map, inhabited by Animals and Beggars; in all the Land there is no other Relic of the Disciplines of Geography.

Suarez Miranda,Viajes de varones prudentes, Libro IV,Cap. XLV, Lerida, 1658

From Jorge Luis Borges, Collected Fictions, Translated by Andrew Hurley Copyright Penguin 1999 .

— On Exactitude in Science
isthisadrelevanttoyou:

“Set in the middle of a city obsessed with mobility, […] in this city Disneyland offers illicit pleasures of mobility. Ensconced in a sea of giant parking-lots in a city devoted to the automobile, it provides transportation that does not exist outside — steam trains, monorails, people–movers, tram–trains, travelators, ropeways, not to mention pure transport fantasies such as simulated space–trips and submarine rides. Under–age children, too young for driver’s licenses, enjoy the license of driving on their own freeway system and adults can step off the pavement and mingle with the buses and trams on Main Street in a manner that would lead to sudden death or prosecution outside. But more than this, the sheer concentration of different forms of mechanical movement means that Disneyland is almost the only place when East Coast town–planning snobs, determined that their cities shall never suffer the automotive ‘fate’ of Los Angeles, can bring their students or their city councillors to see how the alternative might work in the flesh and metal — to this blatantly commercial fun–fair in the city they hate” (Emphasis added).
Banham, Reyner. Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies. Berkely: University of California Press, 2001. 109–110. Print.

isthisadrelevanttoyou:

Set in the middle of a city obsessed with mobility, […] in this city Disneyland offers illicit pleasures of mobility. Ensconced in a sea of giant parking-lots in a city devoted to the automobile, it provides transportation that does not exist outside — steam trains, monorails, people–movers, tram–trains, travelators, ropeways, not to mention pure transport fantasies such as simulated space–trips and submarine rides. Under–age children, too young for driver’s licenses, enjoy the license of driving on their own freeway system and adults can step off the pavement and mingle with the buses and trams on Main Street in a manner that would lead to sudden death or prosecution outside. But more than this, the sheer concentration of different forms of mechanical movement means that Disneyland is almost the only place when East Coast town–planning snobs, determined that their cities shall never suffer the automotive ‘fate’ of Los Angeles, can bring their students or their city councillors to see how the alternative might work in the flesh and metal — to this blatantly commercial fun–fair in the city they hate” (Emphasis added).

Banham, ReynerLos Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies. Berkely: University of California Press, 2001. 109–110. Print.